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Magnus Carlsen’s Net Worth

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What is Magnus Carlsen’s net worth?

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This answer may not be a faithful translation of the answer from

Håkon Hapnes Strand

 in Quora in English :

What is Magnus Carlsen’s net worth?

His stake in PlayMagnus is worth about 8 million dollars after the merger with Chess24.

He has about $6 million in cash in his Magnuschess holding company. Most of this money comes from awards and sponsorship deals. He owns 85% of this company, and his father owns the remaining 15%.

He owns a villa worth about $3 million.

He has about $6 million in cash in his Magnuschess holding company. Most of this money comes from awards and sponsorship contracts. He owns 85% of this company, and his father owns the remaining 15%.

He owns a villa worth about $3 million.

His total net worth should be about $15-20 million. Probably on the low end of that range, unless I’m missing something.

Profile picture for Guillaume Bonnet

Guillaume Bonnet

Student (2019-present)

Translator – Translated 2 years ago – Author has 907 replies and 10M views

Profile picture for Håkon Hapnes Strand

Håkon Hapnes Strand

2171 FIDE. Friend of Magnus Carlsen.

This answer may not be a faithful translation of the answer for

Håkon Hapnes Strand

 in Quora in English:

Does Magnus Carlsen have photographic memory?

Does Magnus Carlsen have a photographic memory?

Yes, he does. He says his memory has deteriorated over the years, but the things I’ve seen him do are absolutely amazing.

At the age of 5, Magnus memorized the populations, capitals, areas, and flags of all 200 countries in the world, much to the surprise of his family, who didn’t even know he was attempting such a thing. However, he had even taken it a step further by memorizing the postal codes of all 400 municipalities in Norway. In memory games, he was always unbeatable

As a young teenager (about 13 years old), Magnus appeared on national television in the offices of Grandmaster Simen Agdestein, the former number one in Norway. The walls of Agdestein’s office were covered with chess notebooks. The general manager, who was sort of his coach at one point, pulled a random book from the shelves, opened it to a random page, and presented a diagram while covering the text. Magnus hesitated for a moment, then gave the names of the players on the diagram, along with the year they had played and the location of the tournament. He repeated this feat a few times. We are talking about games played by Soviet players decades before Magnus was born. And he knew them all.

His friend, general manager Jon Ludvig Hammer, asked Magnus to do this again as an adult, as he prepared for his world championship game with Anand. I think there’s a YouTube video somewhere. Like I said, while his memory has deteriorated, he’s still pretty mind-blowing.

Sure, he performs the usual grandmaster party tricks of doing simultaneous blindfolded demonstrations, but he goes even further. Among his feats, he beat 10 blindfolded players! It’s hard for us mere mortals to understand how difficult this is.

When Magnus is at home in Norway, he sometimes shows up at tournaments. Talking about his own games with him can be quite humbling, as he usually has better memories of them than I do!

I’ve met quite a few smart people, but never people with such a memory.

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